Two Happy Stories

Sometimes, things seem really hard at Kijabe Hospital.  We see a constant stream of really sick and badly injured patients.  We talk and pray with them, give them the best medical care we can, and hope for the best.  Most patients thrive, heal up well, and go on with their lives.  Others suffer greatly, and not all of them survive.  Kijabe can be an intense place to work.

 

Which is why it is so important to celebrate victories.  We have had two small children with really unusual problems this week, but both should go on to have normal lives.

The first patient is Ahmed.  You wouldn’t know that this child lives in a famine plagued corner of Kenya, in the largest refugee camp in the world.  Dadaab is known as an arid, hostile, often violent place where Somalis flee to escape the war and terrorism in their home country.

Happy little Ahmed

Happy little Ahmed

So imagine our delight when this fat, happy, funny baby arrived from that awful place.  Ahmed is six months old, and born with an unusual condition.  He was born with his urinary bladder incompletely formed and outside of his body.  A part of this problem is that the bones of the pelvis don’t form completely, and so don’t come around to meet in the front.  Thus, there is nothing to “hold his insides, in.”  So I got to work with my good friend, Erik Hansen, a paediatric surgeon, and our amazing anesthesia team,

Ahmed safely undergoes anesthesia

Ahmed safely undergoes anesthesia

to fix this problem.  Erik’s assignment was a long and difficult process of forming a new bladder from the tissue available, and placing the new structure inside of the pelvis.  My smaller part was to cut the bones of the pelvis on each side so we could fold them inward, containing the structures on the inside.  I hadn’t done this exact procedure before, so it took a little longer than it should, but it seemed to turn out alright in the end.  Ahmed is doing well, recovering comfortably in his new turtle shell of a cast.

Ahmed, done with surgery, and in his new home, a body cast for six weeks.

Ahmed, done with surgery, and in his new home, a body cast for six weeks.

We’ll plan on removing the cast in about six weeks, and Ahmed can go on his way.

 

Today, I saw a beautiful two day old girl named Elizabeth.  She is a health, happy, peaceful little thing, but has a couple of problems with her legs.   The right knee has a fairly rare problem called “congenital dislocation of the knee.”  For reasons not fully understood, occasionally a child is born with their knee joint dislocated, bending the wrong way, with the foot up near the face.

Congenital Dislocation of the Knee

Congenital Dislocation of the Knee

Though this seems like it should be painful, it isn’t.  Her other foot has a common condition called calcaneovalgus foot deformity, which resolves over time, sometimes with a bit of gentle stretching from the parents.

The treatment for congenital knee dislocation usually requires some manipulation and casting, once a week, for six or eight weeks.  Most babies then develop normally.

gently stretching the dislocated knee back into position

gently stretching the dislocated knee back into position

Elizabeth’s mom was delighted and relieved to know the treatment was so simple, for a condition which looks strange and potentially disabling.

A baby sized cast holds the leg in good position

A baby sized cast holds the leg in good position

Thankfully, the family lives in a village not far from Kijabe, so it shouldn’t be too much of a burden for them to come once a week.  It’s really nice to be able to help these babies, hopefully give them a normal life, instead of one of shame, poverty, and disability.  Patients like these help remind me of the ministry of Kijabe, to show God’s love to people in this part of Africa.

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9 thoughts on “Two Happy Stories

  1. Lynda Corbin

    Thanks for sharing, Mike. Ann had shown Ahmed on Facebook. Continued blessings to you both and you team. Lynda

  2. vidya s bandikalla

    Wonderful Dr Mike. It reminds me of many procedures i did for the first time in mission Hospital.I can do all this through him who gives me strength.Phil 4:13. But I am also aware that “I am the vine; you are the branches. If you remain in me and I in you, you will bear much fruit; apart from me you can do nothing.John 15:5, The difference is you are in Christ or not.Nothing can become everything and everything can become nothing.

  3. Wonderful work.That reminds me of my many ” First time” procedures that did in mission hospital.As philippians 4:13 says I can do all things through Him.I am also reminded that I can do nothing apart from Him John 15: 5.

  4. Cynthia and Bruce DeGroat

    Wonderful to hear such uplifting stories from Kijabe. God Bless all of you and all of your staff!

  5. Mara Stringham

    Thank you so much for sharing this. You are all so encouraging. I pray for all you do and your family.
    God bless you all,
    Mara Stringham

  6. Shannon

    SO good to have happy stories for you to tell and us to hear. Thank you.

  7. Aaron Hoblet

    I hope you all recover well. That’s a big cluster of injury at once!

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